Poultry vaccination

Poultry Connect June 27, 2018

Poultry vaccination

The demand for vaccination of backyard flock has increased with the popularity of keeping chickens. Why should we vaccinate? Vaccination is commonly used in commercial poultry and increasingly in backyard birds to control disease. Vaccines mimic natural infection, allowing the birds to build up immunity to the disease without any of the harmful effects. This way you can prevent your birds getting the disease. Are there any problems with vaccination? No vaccine can be 100% effective, if the birds are vaccinated but exposed to large levels of the wild disease then the immunity generated by the vaccine can be overcome. Also many diseases, such as Infectious Bronchitis (IB), will have several strains so it may mean the strain your bird has been vaccinated against may not be the same as the disease strains in your area. Many of the vaccines come in large doses for commercial flocks and therefore there is

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Fowl Pox

Poultry Connect June 27, 2018

Fowl Pox

Whilst the disease itself is not necessarily life threatening it is a very painful condition and one that is hard to remove from a holding. Cause Fowl pox is caused by a pox virus and mostly affects chickens. There is also a pigeon pox virus and a turkey pox virus. There are three possible ways in which the virus can be spread: Commonly, the virus is shed from Fowl pox wounds on affected birds and enters its next victim through skin wounds. (Normal healthy skin will act as an effective barrier to Fowl pox virus). Biting insects can carry the virus from one bird to another. Pox viruses that infect mammals can be spread through the air and it is thought that this may be a way for Fowl pox to be transmitted Once in the skin, the virus reproduces to cause ‘pocks’. These start off as raised areas which

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Newcastle Disease

Poultry Connect June 27, 2018

Newcastle Disease

Newcastle Disease was first found in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1926 (from whence it got its name).The disease is caused by a virus called Avian Paramyxovirus Type 1. This virus not only infects chickens but can affect all other types of poultry and wild birds. However waterfowl tend not to show signs of ill health, therfore they can be silent carriers of the disease. The virus is spread through the droppings and droplets breathed out by affected birds. Over the next few days the newly infected bird will go on to develop signs of ill health. What makes Newcastle Disease difficult to diagnose is the fact that there are three main types of the virus each of which affect different parts of the body and go on to show different clinical signs. The first type ‘pneumotrophic’ infects the respiratory system of affected birds causing sneezing (snicking), runny nose, runny eyes and a

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Poultry vaccination

Poultry Connect June 27, 2018

Poultry vaccination

The demand for vaccination of backyard flock has increased with the popularity of keeping chickens. Why should we vaccinate? Vaccination is commonly used in commercial poultry and increasingly in backyard birds to control disease. Vaccines mimic natural infection, allowing the birds to build up immunity to the disease without any of the harmful effects. This way you can prevent your birds getting the disease. Are there any problems with vaccination? No vaccine can be 100% effective, if the birds are vaccinated but exposed to large levels of the wild disease then the immunity generated by the vaccine can be overcome. Also many diseases, such as Infectious Bronchitis (IB), will have several strains so it may mean the strain your bird has been vaccinated against may not be the same as the disease strains in your area. Many of the vaccines come in large doses for commercial flocks and therefore there is

Read More